Interview: Eddie Dennis talks Defend, Doug Williams, PROGRESS and ENDVR

August 14, 2013

eddieLast time I interviewed Eddie Dennis (for Spandex, Screw Jobs and Cheap Pops), he was telling me that he’d readjusted his goals in wrestling in order to prioritise his personal life and his day job.

And since then his in-ring career has gone from strength to strength – most recently taking on Doug Williams at PROGRESS.

“That’s the first time I’ve wrestled an established TV talent,” he says. “I’ve wrestled guys who have gone on to be on TV, like Joel [Redman, now Oliver Grey in NXT], but never someone who is already established. Doug is probably one of the biggest active British names – [William] Regal, maybe, is the only person above him in the echelons of British wrestling, so how could you not be excited about wrestling him?” Read the rest of this entry »

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Interview: Mad Man Manson on business, sports entertainment, money and maths

May 2, 2013

mmmI hate to break kayfabe, but I don’t think Mad Man Manson’s actually that mad after all.

That’ll come as no surprise to anyone who saw him in the pre-PCW Festive Fury Q&A alongside John Morrison, Chris Masters and Eugene, when he held forth on the state of the UK wrestling scene and what he perceived as unprofessional, unbusinesslike conduct.

And that’s what we’re discussing now.

“It is a business. It is a job. You charge your price,” he says. “I’ve got my price; if you can’t afford it, fair enough, good luck with your show, and if you need me again, give me a call. But other people, who love wrestling so much, they’ll go down in their price. They’ll say they charge fifty quid, and the guy will hum and hah and say, ‘Oh, well, I can’t really afford that, can you do forty?’ and they’ll say OK.

“That doesn’t work in Tesco if you go in to buy a loaf of bread and it’s priced at 50p and you say, ‘Well, I’ll give you 40p.’ It doesn’t work, because Tesco doesn’t love you. But these guys love wrestling so much that they’re screwing themselves.”

And they’re screwing the other wrestlers on the scene, of course.  Read the rest of this entry »


Recap: TNA British Boot Camp episode 5; or the one with decisions

January 23, 2013

Previously on TNA British Boot Camp! All this happened, and now we’re on a mega-double-episode-feast to find out who’s going to win the contract.

Last time we saw our quartet, they had just arrived at OVW, where Doug Williams had his characteristic ‘faintly amused’ expression, and Al Snow taught everyone how to run the ropes properly while being entirely puzzled by the very concept of twins.

Spud talks about Al’s knowledge being a “godsend” (though presumably not about human genetics) because there are not many veterans in Britain; or at least not ones who want to train the next generation, mostly because of their aversion to “American-style wrestling”.

Marty talks about Doug being an ambassador for wrestling and SERIOUSLY SCURLL WHAT THE HELL ARE YOU WEARING?

marty wtf

 

Read the rest of this entry »


Recap: TNA British Boot Camp episode 4; or The One With Tongues

January 16, 2013

Previously on TNA British Boot Camp – this, this and this!

This week they’re off to Nashville to see Dixie Carter at TNA HQ. Spud’s eyes are like saucers. “Dixie, this place is enormous!”

saucers

Oh, honey, everywhere is enormous compared to you, except maybe a model village. Read the rest of this entry »


Facts from Total Action Wrestling, Dunstable Leisure Centre, May 26th 2012

May 28, 2012

“I’ve wrestled in Dunstable before,” mused Doug Williams to me, “but that was at the Queensway Hall.”

Ah, Dunstable. The place where Henry VIII divorced Katherine of Aragon. A market town whose market now closely resembles a car boot sale. And the small town where I grew up.

I don’t remember seeing wrestling shows advertised in Dunstable when I was a kid, to be fair, but the Queensway Hall would have been a fabulous place for it – a huge civic arena with plenty of seating and great sight-lines.

Sadly the Queensway Hall is no more. It was knocked down, and now there’s an Asda in its place.

So Total Action Wrestling host their events at the Leisure Centre – across the road from the Queensway Hall’s former site. Read the rest of this entry »


Interview: Johnny Moss talks coach trips, TNA and The Apprentice

April 25, 2012

When and how did you first become interested in wrestling?

My first memory of wrestling was my dad taking to to watch wrestling at Whitehaven Civic Hall when I was eight years old; I can remember Fit Finlay and Big Daddy being on the show but nothing else really.

My interest really picked up though when I first watched WWF on Sky Sports back in 1990 and I was hooked from then on. I would collect every magazine possible and was fascinated by all the different promotions and wrestlers from all over the world. I quickly found a tape trader and would get tapes from virtually every promotion possible – I was hooked!

I finally decided to take the plunge after seeing an advert in Power Slam magazine for the Hammerlock School of Wrestling and attended my first training camp in 1997. This was a bit of a trek for me as Hammerlock was based in Kent and I lived in Cumbria;  I also wasn’t driving at the time so I would take a nine-hour National Express coach overnight to London then get the train to Sittingbourne. I did this on a regular basis and it could be quite brutal as I would finish work on Friday, travel overnight, train Saturday and Sunday then travel home Sunday night, but I didn’t care, I loved it! Some people these days think they’re going out their way if they have to drive an hour – they’re the ones that should just probably pack it in. Read the rest of this entry »


Review: BritWresFest (Wrestling With Ethics), Coronet, London, April 1st 2012

April 1, 2012

Right, let’s get this bit out of the way first. This Wrestling With Ethics show was for charity, raising money for Great Ormond Street Children’s Hospital, and that has to be the primary thing to take away from the afternoon. They could have put the worst card ever on, and it would still have been a commendable enterprise.

However, it was by no means the worst card ever. Some of the top UK promotions put together showcase matches, with titles on the line all round, and it was great to see some of the best British talent on the same bill. Read the rest of this entry »